The exhibition explores the founding of the Ateneo Art Gallery (AAG), the first institution of its kind in the Philippines, in the context of modern art after the Second World War and the unspoken utopian vision that underpins its development. Bookended by the destruction of Manila and the contemporary themes represented by select artists, the exhibition immerses the viewer in modern art as it highlights the utopian context of the AAG from the period of decolonization, which saw the emergence of a new postcolonial state, to the current times of economic meltdowns and environmental crises, which demand brave new futures. The exhibition consists of fourteen sections illuminating key historical moments in modern art in the country from the last half century. At its heart lies the hope to reexamine the paths that Filipino art has taken to envision a modern nation in pursuit of freedom.

 



The Ateneo Art Gallery presents Stirring the Ashes by Leslie de Chavez, opening on Saturday, 23 July at 4pm. De Chavez was one of the three winners of the 2014 Ateneo Art Awards and the recipient of the Ateneo Art Gallery – Liverpool Hope University Residency Grant. De Chavez won the award for his works in the 2014 Lopez Museum exhibition Complicated which investigated the complex relationship of the Philippines with its former colonizers, the United States and Spain.

Through his paintings and installations, de Chavez reflects on the power structures of the past and present, giving visual form to the disparities that have persisted throughout history. Using powerful images and text, De Chavez captures your attention and forces you to reflect upon his subjects. These continue to haunt you beyond your physical encounter with them.

Stirring the Ashes opens on Saturday, 23 July 2016 at 4 pm. Artspeak : Leslie de Chavez in conversation with Fr. Jason Dy is on Thursday, 18 August at 4 pm. For more information visit www.ateneoartgallery.org or call the exhibition coordinator, Tricia Raya at 4266488.



Badong: Salvador Bernal Designs the Stage opens at the Ateneo Art Gallery on 21 April, Thursday.  A touring exhibition organised by the Cultural Centre of the Philippines (CCP), it honors the late Salvador F. Bernal (1945-2011), National Artist for Theater Design, in a retrospective that highlights his various design projects in ballet, opera, theater, and film from the 1970s until 2011.

Acknowledged as the “Father of Theater Design in the Philippines”, Bernal was instrumental in elevating theater and production design as a fine art and a profession.  He helped establish the Production Design Center (PDC) as a division under the then CCP Performing Arts Department which he headed from 1981-1994.  The PDC building was inaugurated in 1993, a three-story building designed with facilities to execute large-scale theater props and fabricate and store costumes.  Bernal also initiated the founding of the Kapisanan sa Pilipinas ng mga Production Designer or KAPPROD, which later became the Philippine Association of Theater Designer and Technician (PATDAT).

The exhibition is a homecoming of sorts and will reintroduce Badong Bernal to a younger generation of Ateneans.  He is one of the school’s illustrious alumni and was instrumental in strengthening the humanities program and theater practice in the university.  He taught under the Interdisciplinary Studies Department and Fine Art Program.  Guest curators for this exhibition include Dr. Nicanor Tiongson, Gino Gonzales, and Ricardo Cruz, all Ateneo graduates and close friends and collaborators of Bernal.  They provide an insightful perspective to the artist’s professional practice as well as his personal life.

Tiongson, former CCP Artistic Director, authored the book on Bernal published in 2007.  He and Bernal worked together in the 1990s for productions such as Pilipinas Circa and Realizing Rama. Under Tiongson’s term as CCP Artistic Director, Bernal’s long-time dream of setting up the Production Design Center was realized.

Gino Gonzales was a student and apprentice of Bernal, who encouraged him to pursue further studies in Set and Costume Design. He completed his MFA in Theater Design at the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University in 2001. Gonzales has since designed sets and costumes for various theater productions in Manila, Singapore, Japan and New York.   Gonzales’ general design brief for the exhibit was further developed by the creative team of B+C Designs, headed by Baby and Coco Anne.

Ricardo Cruz, head of the CCP Production Design and Technical Services Division and lead coordinator of this project, also trained under Bernal.  He assisted Bernal in many projects at the CCP from the 1980s to the 1990s.  Since taking over the post of Bernal at the CCP, Cruz has continued on the advocacy to promote and professionalize theater design practice.

The exhibit features scale models, drawings and sketches, costumes, and digital images of Bernal’s many projects, among them created for Ballet Philippines and Tanghalang Pilipino where he was then CCP resident designer.  He collaborated closely with theater stalwarts of these two CCP resident companies such as Alice and Denisa Reyes and the late Rolando Tino.

Dr. Nicanor Tiongson will give a curator’s lecture on 21 April, Thursday at 4:00 pm and will be followed by the official opening of the exhibition.

The exhibit will run until 23 July 2016.  Viewing hours are 8 am – 7:30 pm, Mondays to Fridays; 8 am – 6 pm, Saturdays.  The Ateneo Art Gallery is open to the public. Individual visitors, Ateneo students, faculty, and staff may tour the galleries free of charge.  For groups larger than 20, there is a fee of Php 30.00 per head.  For more information, contact the Curatorial Office at 426.6488.

 

Badong: Salvador Bernal Designs the Stage

Curated by Dr. Nicanor Tiongson, Gino Gonzalez and Ricardo Cruz

21 April – 23 July 2016

Artspeak with exhibition curator Dr. Nicanor Tiongson | 4 pm

Opening Reception | 5:30 pm

Thursday, 21 April 2016



Now in its twelfth year, the Ateneo Art Awards was established to honor the memory of the founding benefactor of the Ateneo Art Gallery, Fernando Zobel (1924-1984). Originally conceived to shine the spotlight on young and emerging artists, the Ateneo Art Awards is now a venue to recognize outstanding achievements in art writing as well, with the 2014 inauguration of the Purita Kalaw-Ledesma Art Criticism Prize.

Shortlists of 12 artists and 4 writers have been drawn up by their respective juries. The Fernando Zobel Prizes for Visual Art are awarded to three Filipino visual artists, below the age of 36, for outstanding works exhibited between 2 May 2014 and 1 May 2015 . The Purita Kalaw-Ledesma Prize is awarded to the author of a review of an exhibition selected by the representatives from the Ateneo Art Gallery, the Kalaw-Ledesma Foundation, and The Philippine Star.

In alphabetical order, the 12 shortlisted visual artists are:

  • Pio Abad, for The Collection of Jane Ryan and William Saunders, a solo exhibition at Jorge B. Vargas Museum and Filipiniana Research Center;
  • Catalina Africa, for her solo show Reverse Boomerangs and Other Exercises for Pleasure, shown at 1335 Mabini;
  • Charles Buenconsejo for Unending Void, a solo exhibition at ArtInformal;
  • Frank Callaghan for Dead Ends, a solo show at Silverlens Galleries, Manila;
  • Buen Calubayan, for “Eternal Landscape”, shown at the Ayala Museum as part of the exhibition, The Triumph of Philippine Art;
  • Ian Carlo Jaucian for his work in In the Year 2000, a joint exhibition mounted at Silverlens Galleries, Manila;
  • Lui Medina for her solo, Lui Medina, shown at ArtInformal;
  • Veronica Pee for the solo, Pocket Universe, shown at ArtInformal;
  • Luis Santos for Measuring Distances, shown at Silverlens Galleries, Manila;
  • Maria Taniguchi for her “Untitled” works, shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Antwerp, as part of the group show Don’t You Know Who I Am?;
  • Derek Tumala, for Sacred Geometry, a solo show by The Drawing Room for Art Fair Philippines 2015;
  • And Ryan Villamael for the solo exhibition Isles, shown at Silverlens Galleries, Manila.


Anton del Castillo’s A Child’s Memory takes upon the dialectics of memory, gender, and transforming or transformative spaces. Jackstones, a skill-developing toy and a handful of which can fit in the palm of a child, are rendered into oversized, metallic sculptures— what seems to be a mundane toy is turned into a whimsical and dream-like object, calling to mind such stories as Alice in Wonderland.

Through its sheer size, it also transforms its space, an area behind the Ateneo de Manila University’s Social Sciences Building— a transitory and unnoticed space, bringing a sense of curiosity and awe. Del Castillo draws a connection from his previous work from Juvenile Traces, in which he explored how children, especially boys, are acculturated into violence through the acceptability of toy guns as gender appropriate toys for boys. Girls are not spared from this acculturation, as seen from dolls which ingrain in them aspirations that might not be realistic and could lead to unreasonable expectations with regards to their bodies. In this vein, by presenting jackstones, a toy often associated for girls but could be played by anyone— even adults, he not only invites us to revisit our childhood, an age of innocence and absence of prejudice, but also encourages us to re-assess pre-conceived notions of gender roles.

Anton del Castillo’s A Child’s Memory open on 12 November 2014.  Museum hours are Monday –Friday 8 am – 7:30 pm; Saturday 8 am – 6pm; closed Sundays and Holidays. For more information, please contact Ria Talamayan-Aguilar at 4266488 or via email at rtalamayan@ateneo.edu .